Full Report:

MON 12:30 PM: Poster Session: Working with Models

Dynamic Simulation of Construction Waste in Macao

by Kampeng Lei, Lianggang Lu, Waikin Chan

Figure1: Dynamic Simulation of Construction Waste in Macao

As mentioned in the synopsis, the authors have studied the construction waste in Macao from 2006 projected to 2025. They have selected four sources of construction waste as the object of the study. These are the construction of new casinos and hotels (CWCH), the interior renovation of residences (CWIR), civil and private construction projects (CWCP), and reconstruction of old zones in Macao (CWRO). They have generated the construction waste equations according to their findings with statistical analysis. For example, construction of new casinos and hotels is determined by tourists, population, area, and year. On the other hand, reconstruction of old zones in Macao is determined by the population and reconstruction ratio.

As a result of the simulation, the authors say that total construction waste will be lower in 2025 compared to 2006. Construction waste due to civil and private construction projects (CWCP) will increase. The results can be seen in Figure 2 in detail.

Figure 2: Simulation graph (2006-2025)

 

Modeling Spiral of Silence Process: A Case-Study of Iran Presidential Elections 1997

by Arash Farsi, Anahita Khojandi, Leila Soltani.

Figure 3: Modeling Spiral of Silence Process: A Case-Study of Iran's Presidential Elections 1997

This poster presents a study about the political tendencies of people in Iran. They have constructed a model as seen in Figure 4. The model consists of parameters like voting age, average monthly income, etc. Public tendency to change is an important variable governing the changes in the thoughts of people.

Distribution of people before the election can be seen in Figure 5. Supporters of conservatives constitute thirty-two percent of the total. Non-voters constitute forty-fou percent, which is very high. After the elections, nearly sixty percent of the votes were for the reformists, and the percentage of non-voters decreased to twenty percent, representing a sharp change in the votes. Authors reasonably asked the question, “What would happen if the elections had been held a month later?” They are investigating these sort of questions now.

Figure 4: Model of the Supporters and Non-Voters

Figure 5: Distribution of supporters and non-voters before election

Bilge Kucuk

<Back to the Synopsis>